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DOES EDUCATION NEED A RE-BRAND TO ENCOURAGE MORE GIRLS STAY IN SCHOOL?

The answer is "Yes" because I believe in investing into the education of girls as one of the most inclusive approaches of human development.
There is evidence that the education of women and girls has a positive impact on economic, social, cultural and public health development, particularly in developing countries. When women are educated, they become empowered to participate in family decision-making and community life; they are better prepared to protect their own health and that of their loved ones.
Educating girls also has a multiplier effect. When you educate a girl, you give her the ability to have a greater influence on the future of her own children's education. The education of girls benefits society as a whole, including: the girl herself, her family and future generations, the community in which she lives and even the entire country that will derive dividends from the girl's education in terms of increase in growth points and reduction of child mortality and extreme poverty.
In short, the education of girls is essential to the development of their abilities and aspirations and for their independence. For this reason, investing in the education of girls is one of the most inclusive approaches of human development.
Even with access to education, girls still face many barriers: educational costs, cultural norms and gender roles (specifically prescribed for girls such as helping in the kitchen and with household chores), early marriage and early motherhood - responsible for 15 to 30% of secondary female student dropouts - or even the violence they encounter at school.
Unfortunately, this is an almost universal problem singling out girls as the most vulnerable. According to Youth Skilling Organization Uganda's research, schoolgirls of all ages have repeatedly suffered harassment or sexual assault, discrimination based on their sex, physical and psychological intimidation and even rape at school. Many report that they have been publicly humiliated by school officials simply Thanks to the efforts of the Youth Skilling Organization Uganda, particularly through the Teaching and Education program, so many girls have never before been enrolled in school than during the last decade here in Uganda. Currently, while the international community renews its commitment to the 2030 Education Program, more and more girls will be enrolling in schools over the next years. However, enrolling is not enough, they must stay in school! One of the greatest challenges facing schoolgirls and female students is school-based violence.
Youth Skilling Organization Uganda explains school-related gender-based violence as 'any act of sexual, physical or psychological violence inflicted on children in and around schools due to stereotypes and roles or norms assigned to them or expected of them because of their sex or gender identity'. This type of violence affects hundreds of millions of children. It is a phenomenon that affects all countries of the world not only Uganda, regardless of their social, cultural or economic differences.
Of course, no individual can solve these huge problems, but if everyone carries out their role as global citizens, we will be well on our way. As Edmund Burke once said: "Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little."

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